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My Style: Jump to It with People Tree & What Daisy Did*

By March 7, 2017 My Style

It seems the last time I shot a full outfit post was back in November last year. Due to the fact I do so much more photography for my blog in recent times, I often forget that I haven’t solely focused on my style, so I’m back at it again today. If you haven’t read my blog post on sustainable wardrobes, you won’t know why I’m re-wearing a lot of the same items recently. Hopefully, this outfit will be a bit of a mix-up!

Ethical Outfit Ideas - People Tree Jumpsuit & Recycled Leather What Daisy Did Bag

Ethical Outfit Ideas - People Tree Jumpsuit & Recycled Leather What Daisy Did Bag

Ethical Outfit Ideas - People Tree Jumpsuit & Recycled Leather What Daisy Did Bag


 WHAT I WORE: Pink Cashmere Roll Neck (Charity Shop) // Navy Livia Jumpsuit £90.00 (People Tree)* // Clarabella Bag £33.00 (What Daisy Did)* // Vagabond Dioon Platforms (Mastershoe)* // Sunglasses (Topshop – old) // Stacker Ring (Gemporia)*


The last time a People Tree item entered my wardrobe, I wore it non-stop. The fabric was beautifully soft, the fit was comfortable yet the sleeves and shape made up for how casual it seemed and the pattern and overall design was eye-catching but abstract enough that it was wearable with a lot of my other clothes. This time is exactly the same but it’s an even better experience.

As my style has started to evolve, I’ve started to attract two very different styles of dress; fitted and shaped, or floaty and draped (that rhyme wasn’t intentional, but it works). This jumpsuit is of course of a fitted variety yet it hits my sweet spot for floatiness by having a comfortable looseness in the trousers. The last time I owned a jumpsuit was actually back when I started my blog (five years at the end of this month!) and I wore it so much it became faded and the fabric started to bobble. Although it’s a much higher quality than that one, I can quite easily see myself wearing it until it’s officially just a piece of loungewear. It’s comfortable, but it’s enough to make me feel dressed up, suited and booted.

Ethical Outfit Ideas - People Tree Jumpsuit & Recycled Leather What Daisy Did Bag

Ethical Outfit Ideas - People Tree Jumpsuit & Recycled Leather What Daisy Did Bag

Ethical Outfit Ideas - People Tree Jumpsuit & Recycled Leather What Daisy Did Bag


whomademyclothes

~ WHO MADE MY JUMPSUIT? ~
Assisi Garments – a garment manufacturer using organic cotton to produce garments for People Tree, supporting deaf, mute and economically disadvantaged women by providing training and employment. 


I have worn this jumpsuit buttoned up and without another item underneath but instead of showing you that outfit (which involves the yellow leather jacket you are probably all sick of by now) which you can actually see on the People Tree Instagram account, I thought I would layer things up with my trusty cashmere sweater. It was the perfect combination for what felt like a spring day recently; no jacket or coat needed, just a pair of sunglasses. Yay for sunshine!

When I looked down at my platforms I realised this could definitely be seen as a 70s apre-ski inspired outfit. The collar on the playsuit definitely lives up to that aesthetic especially when it’s in such a retro looking print… which for any cat lovers out there, is actually a diagonal repeat of a kitten. You can’t tell from afar though which I like meaning it doesn’t take away from the chicness. On top of all that, the fabric is organic cotton.

I hope you like that new segment of “Who made my…”. I’ll try and add that in as many outfit posts as possible to as many clothes I wear as possible! For more info about the Fashion Revolution campaign, #WhoMadeMyClothes, make sure you head over to their site. Fashion Revolution week is in April; get ready!

Ethical Outfit Ideas - People Tree Jumpsuit & Recycled Leather What Daisy Did Bag

Ethical Outfit Ideas - People Tree Jumpsuit & Recycled Leather What Daisy Did Bag

In terms of accessories, I have a new handbag in my life. I’ve been wearing my suede tassel bag for so long now that it’s started to get a bit grubby so to swap it out for a while, I have this gorgeous Clarabella bag from What Daisy Did. I connected with Daisy on Twitter and have been in awe of their brand ever since. What Daisy Did uses recycled materials and when it comes to their colourful leather collection, the materials that would be going to waste are collected from factories within a 140km radius of where the bags are made.

Their website is pretty much transparent all around and states that their workers set their own deadlines for what they can produce, meaning no pressure is put on them to meet deadlines. For me, this is hugely important and ties in with one of the biggest issues within the fashion industry today. If I’m using up waste materials and I know that this is the case, it’s a cause for a huge sigh of relief.

I understand that leather isn’t for everyone but the materials What Daisy Did use would otherwise be added to a landfill. Leather is somewhat sustainable in terms of how long it lasts, it’s just the actual process of creating it which is the problem. I really love this bag though and knowing where it came from makes it even more beautiful to look at. And yes, I can’t escape yellow – that small bit of dealing works wonders with my jacket 😉


 How would you wear this jumpsuit? What ethical clothes have you been buying recently? Let’s talk in the comments!


Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Feminist T-Shirts That Were Actually Made by Feminists

By February 2, 2017 Ethical

Recent news brings activism and marches for issues which should have been put behind us years ago. It’s a shame we still have to fight for basic equality and against discrimination but it’s also a shame that what we buy to make our voices clearer don’t always support the causes fully. Today, I wanted to focus on some march-worthy feminist t-shirts that were actually made by feminists… not the high street slogan tee kind.

ethical feminist t-shirts - people tree - my sister - it's me and you


PEOPLE TREE ~ EQUALITY T-SHIRT ~ £32.00

Image via People Tree, edited by me.


You probably already know but I’m a huge fan of People Tree. Their website is as clear as day when it comes to transparency and ethics. Every item is clearly marked with certifications in terms of organic cotton and Fair Trade processes. This specific ‘Equality’ t-shirt is guaranteed to have been made with equality in mind, seeing as it was produced by Assisi Garments, a social enterprise in India.

Set up by Franciscan nuns, it provides training and employment for deaf, mute and economically disadvantaged women, and thanks to the partnership and support from People Tree themselves, their team has grown from 8 to over 100 employees. Assisi Garments also invests in the community by supporting various social projects, including a cancer hospital and an AIDS rehabilitation centre in South India.

I wrote a blog post a while back on my thoughts on feminism and fast-fashion, so it’s really refreshing to see a garment being produced in such a positive and empowering environment. In my opinion, if you’re going to be buying a t-shirt with the word ‘equality’ on the front of it, it should have been made by people who truly believe in that statement too.

ethical feminist t-shirts - people tree - my sister - it's me and you


IT’S ME AND YOU ~ FEMINIST T-SHIRT ~ $48.00

Image via It’s Me and You, edited by me.


A new discovery for me, but a good one nonetheless, is It’s Me and You. It’s especially important because as of November 2016, after the US election, 100% of this t-shirts profits have been going to donated to the workshop, An Afternoon For You. The workshop is run to support and empower children that will be most vulnerable and at risk during the next four years of the Presidency. After the election, community based and localized education will be especially important going forward, especially safe spaces for children.

Created by Mayan Toledano and Julia Baylis, It’s Me and You is a hub for body positivity, an issue which is especially for women in current times. This t-shirt in particular is 100 percent cotton, hand printed and made in the USA. Although that isn’t quite as transparent as the likes of People Tree, I feel comfortable enough in sharing their products because sometimes it is more about the story and what the brand embraces.

We have to support our ideals and what we believe in. Every penny we spend is a vote towards that, and It’s Me and You is a prime example of where we should put our money especially when everything seems so unfair.

ethical feminist t-shirts - people tree - my sister - it's me and you


MY SISTER ~ FEMINIST T-SHIRT ~ $22.00

Image via My Sister, edited by me.


Last but definitely not least, is this feminist t-shirt produced by My Sister. Their mission is to prevent sex trafficking whilst empowering the population and providing after-care for survivors, all by promoting messages through their ethically produced, sweat-shop free products. It makes sense that this is their mission seeing as both of their tag lines are either “Fighting sex trafficking one shirt at a time” or “Apparel against sex trafficking”.

The main inspiration for this blog post and my aforementioned post about feminism and fast-fashion come from my reading of Threadbare: Clothes, Sex & Trafficking, My Sister is a rather important brand to shop from. Not only are they promoting equality and feminist messages through what they sell, but they’re also supporting the communities which are affected by these serious issues.

Plus, the fact that they’re using male models and targeting a unisex audience is super important. Feminism isn’t just about cis-women, it’s about gender equality no matter what gender, sexual orientation, race or religion.


Do you know of any ethically conscious brands selling feminist and activist t-shirts? Let me know in the comments!


Slightly different post style to what I’ve been publishing recently, but I couldn’t let this idea slip and it was wonderful discovering a few positive brands. I’ll be back soon…

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Where to Buy Ethical Clothes | UPDATED Ethical Directory 2017

By January 27, 2017 Ethical

This blog post has been a while in the making for several reasons and due to several road blocks but  I am finally happy to publicly and properly release my updated ethical directory into the world! I want to try and make a real effort it with it this time, hence the updated layout and much easier to use format. Read on for more information and to find out where to shop for ethical clothes…

ethical directory - where to buy ethical clothes

ethical directory - where to buy ethical clothes

ethical directory - where to buy ethical clothes


FEATURED ITEMS: Wander Wonder Sweatshirt £33.00 (Lost Shapes)* // Zhandra Rhodes T-Shirt (People Tree) // Patterned Culottes (ASOS Africa)


Seeing as I go on about them so much, I get asked about where to buy ethical clothes a whole lot. At first, when you’re only just starting to change your shopping habits, it can seem impossible to find anything which isn’t unfairly made or seriously damaging to the environment, but it’s not impossible. It takes searching to find hidden gems that honour and value the idea of well-made, sustainable products.

This is where my (now updated) ethical directory comes in – I want to try and make it a little easier for you. I want to try and update the list as often as I can and really celebrate the idea of ethical fashion and all of it’s greatness. I’ll talk you through a couple of the brands listed in this blog post, but I’m inviting you to click over to my new ethical directory for yourself, and find a brand that takes your fancy! It might only be small now, but I’m hoping it will grow and grow in the future…

ethical directory - where to buy ethical clothes

ethical directory - where to buy ethical clothes


ethical directory - where to buy ethical clothes

~ ETHICAL DIRECTORY ~
A selection of the brands featured…


new-lost-shapesEst. since: 2012
Mission: Lost Shapes products are all made from 100% organic cotton or other sustainable fabrics such as Tencel, and produced using renewable energy. They provide screen printed, organic fair trade products for all the family.
Price range: £12 - £30

Shop Lost Shapes

Est. since: 2005
Mission: Thought (formerly Braintree) is based upon the idea of sustainability and "thoughtful clothing". They use some of the most organic and long lasting fabrics around and ensure that the production process is just as sustainable and ethical. Slow fashion is what they thrive on!
Price range: £5+

Shop Thought

new-braintree
new-people-treeEst. since: 2001
Mission: People Tree aims to be 100% Fair Trade through the whole supply chain. They do this by using natural resources and sustainable materials, and supporting their producers by challenging power structures to gain them their rights to a livelihood.
Price range: £15 - £200+

Shop People Tree


Est. since: 2016
Mission: Sheer Apparel focuses on providing the best ethical and sustainable options for all aspects of your wardrobe, at prices comparable to brands you've loved for years.
Price range: £16+

Shop Sheer Apparel

new-waisteEst. since: 2013
Mission: WAISTE is an online vintage shop full of beautiful recycled treasures, adding to the number of clothes that are recycled each year.
Price range: £15+

Shop WAISTE


All of the brands selected and included in the directory, were chosen by myself after scouring the internet. Some of them focus on more ethical issues, and some of them focus on more sustainable issues, like the Lost Shapes sweatshirt I’m wearing in the photos…

ethical directory - where to buy ethical clothes

I actually think Lost Shapes are a really nice starting point, especially if you’re looking for basics. Their pieces aren’t necessarily ‘fashion’ pieces or trend led, but I think that’s something you have to take on board when it comes to slow fashion. The goal of course, is to have an industry which is ethical, sustainable and somewhat trend led, but trends lead to consumerism and we all know what happens then…

The sweatshirt I’m wearing is made from 100% recycled fabrics; 60% recycled pre-consumer cotton, and 40% recycled post-consumer polyester – that’s directly from the label on the inside of the seam. It’s so refreshing to wear something that comes from a transparent and open company, and the screen printing adds a wonderful finishing touch, as it’s printed in house in England.

Ethical fashion isn’t just about hemp and natural fibre dresses, and I want to try and prove that, but I also want your help too!

Ethical Directory - Where to Buy Ethical Clothes

Make sure you share your favourite brands in the comments or send me a tweet so I can add them to the directory!

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Why Ethical Fashion Shouldn’t Make You Feel Bad & How to Spread Awareness

By January 4, 2017 Ethical

Hello, hello, welcome to 2017! I hope you all had a good New Year and enjoy the holidays. I’m back and have ideas flowing out of my fingertips so I hope you’re ready for the next twelve months ahead. I thought I would start off with something that’s fresh in my mind and that will hopefully put all of those confused and concerned about ethical fashion, at ease.

learning about ethical fashion - raising awareness - clothing poverty by andrew brooks


FEATURED IN THIS POST: People Tree x Zandra Rhodes Top // Lost Shapes Sweatshirt* // Clothing Poverty by Andrew Brooks


I can quite clearly remember multiple conversations with family members over the past couple of years that have all come around to one or several people feeling a little guilty or downtrodden by what I’ve attempted to teach them. Perhaps you’ve felt this way; maybe you’ve come away feeling as if everything you’ve ever purchased has been doing damage and you immediately want to burn it all and start fresh?

Perhaps you’ve watched a video about the horrendous working conditions at the factories of some of your favourite brands and you’ve wanted to boycott them immediately? Perhaps you’ve even read one of my blog posts and wanted to never come back to my site because you just know you’ll feel that sense of dread again?

All of those feelings are totally valid, and I want to apologise if I’ve ever made you feel that way, because that obviously wasn’t my intent. After reading and listening and learning, I’ve opened my eyes to the fact that throwing all of this information out into the world doesn’t always have the desired effect. I’m glad that so far I’ve opened up my eyes to so many of you and that I’ve received such wonderful feedback in doing so, but I know there is a better way of doing it, and I know there are reasons why even if you do read all of these facts and terrifying stories about the fashion industry, it shouldn’t make you feel bad.

Ethical fashion isn’t about trying to single out the people who shop a certain way, because trust me, I know it isn’t easy. I can’t count how many times I’ve been told that ethical or sustainable options aren’t always accessible to everyone; I know they aren’t.

learning about ethical fashion - raising awareness - people tree organic textiles

I know that buying clothes for work example, isn’t exactly easy to do when buying second-hand or from more “expensive” (I put that in quotes due to the fact that cheap prices come with far bigger costs, as we already know) ethically focused brands, when you need to be putting your money somewhere else in your monthly budget. I know that shopping for a certain body size isn’t always easy either, when the industry is so focused on a specific, smaller one… so, you shouldn’t feel bad about it.

If you can only shop a certain way at the moment, then that’s okay. The fact that you’re even thinking about the way you shop, is a good start. The reason you shouldn’t feel bad about it, though, is because ethical fashion is all about the opposite – it’s about feeling good in what you wear and what you purchase. It’s about feeling good about what you’re doing for the world.

When we start shopping consciously and we start to just think about what we’re doing with our clothes, we should start feeling better about ourselves, not the opposite. We should start feeling better about the fact we’re not just helping our bodies and what we put on it – we’re also helping the people who made the clothes we wear, and the earth that helped produce even the fabric that it’s made up of. It’s actually a really positive thing, even if the hard facts and truths can bog us down.

learning about ethical fashion - raising awareness - lost shapes sweatshirt

Shopping ethically doesn’t make you a better person, in the end. I’m not perfect, and I’ll admit it. I eat meat, I’m not so much of a conscious shopper when it comes to lifestyle and beauty products… but every small contribution I do make (and let me make a point of this again – even just thinking about what you’re doing, means something) makes the world better, which seems a bit sappy and a bit hippy, doesn’t it? But it’s true.

So, next time you shop with a brand that isn’t necessarily ethical or sustainable, think about what good you’re doing in making different choices all of the other times. Feel proud of yourself, not sad and guilty for when you do buy or support the brands that could be doing better. Feel proud of yourself when you recycle or give away your clothes to a friend. It’s not about singling out the bad stuff – it’s about looking to the future and envisioning the good stuff.

That leads me on to the second part of this post, for those of you trying to spread awareness. How do we do it? How do we make people feel good? How do we make people who haven’t yet learnt, know what’s really going on?

learning about ethical fashion - raising awareness - clothing poverty by andrew brooks

Remind people that small steps add up to big things…

As I have mentioned continuously throughout this post, I believe that even thinking and shopping consciously, can do a whole lot more good than nothing. Even if right now, someone can’t shop with your brand or can’t follow in your exact footsteps, they need to know that even supporting the idea of equality and human rights and all of the issues we’re trying to change is doing something. Make them feel good about the little things, and even better about the big things.

Be relatable…

Sharing your journey and sharing what struggles you’ve been through can really put things into perspective. If you’re still learning yourself, admit that. Bring people along with you so that they feel inspired to start making changes. Talk about how you’re not perfect and that it’s okay to take your time. Making someone feel as if they are on the right path and that they’re not alone, can mean a whole lot.

Seeing is believing…

One of the main reasons I first became interested in ethical fashion, was because I watched the documentary, The True Cost. It was one of the first times I really saw the effects of the fast-fashion industry, visually. It changed my whole mindset because I could truly see how things worked. Reading is all well and good, but how are people supposed to know what is actually going on if they don’t have some sort of photographic or visual evidence?

If you’re a blogger, sharing documentaries and videos can always help because it gives people something to interact with, rather than to just click off and have information stored away in their minds.

Integrate your influence…

Influencing people can often feel overwhelming when it’s a long, static blog post, so keeping the conversation flowing into social media and into platforms that people use regularly keeps it in their minds. Also using social media to connect with other like-minded people in order to work out even better ways of getting the message across, can be helpful too. I highly recommend joining in with the #EthicalHour Twitter chat, every Monday, and joining the group on Facebook.


Do the affects of fast-fashion make you feel bad? How do you spread awareness of them? Let me know in the comments!

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Illustrated Designs: Practicing Repeat Patterns with Watercolour

By July 30, 2016 Designs

It’s been a while since I’ve posted some designs on here. I’m pretty much a perfectionist so I only ever like to share things that I’m genuinely happy with or I at least think are worth sharing. After fiddling around and practicing my watercolour painting techniques and watercolour repeat patterns, I doodled up a quick one and was set a small brief to draw up some rough ideas to make them come to life… and they’re worth sharing, I suppose! Plus, it was totally an excuse to try out the illustrative style I’ve fallen in love with…


© Original designs by Tolly Dolly Posh. More info here


watercolour repeat patterns illustrated fashion design

~ LOOSE V-NECK CAMI & JERSEY PRINTED SKIRT ~

The brief was to sketch up some simple items that could be easily cut and put together, and my first thought was loose and unfitted. I personally love layering, so most of the low-cut v-neck items in this blog post are ideally meant for that purpose. A ditsy floral print would work really well, especially if layered over a contrast blouse or shirt. It genuinely would be a straight up and down cami with the only detailing being the deep neckline, making it a simple throw on and throw away piece (by throw away I mean, into your drawers).

The skirt would be a thicker jersey material, in a simple circle skirt/A-line fit. Stretchy and comfortable, but thicker than the more silk like cami to match. I love experimenting with different colour ways and print scales, hence why the skirt and top mismatch. The addition of the ruffled arm cuffs and collar are based around the seasonal trends at the moment, which are also in a mixmatched colour way.

watercolour repeat patterns illustrated fashion design

~ LOOSE V-NECK MAXI DRESS ~

Another flowing v-neck design in a powder purple. Similar in shape to the cami already mentioned, it’s simply straight up and down and due to it’s extremely relaxed and loose nature, has no zips or buttons as it can be taken on and off with ease. I understand that it looks like a rather daring neckline, but once again, it’s intended for layering, but for these sketches I didn’t want to take away from the main idea.

watercolour repeat patterns illustrated fashion design

~ LOOSE V-NECK PLAYSUIT ~

Almost identical to the maxi dress, this playsuit is again just straight up and down and simple; the fabric being loose enough for a no-zip access. It’s a rather ‘boyish’ fit, with lots of room in the legs and body for movement not only for the wearer, but also for the fabric. A slightly bigger print scale allows the green to contrast against the darker greens within the print, and adds for a more camouflage, botanical feel.

watercolour repeat patterns illustrated fashion design

~ MOCK-UP DESIGN (Original item via People Tree) ~

I also wanted to do a quick mock-up using an ‘already in production’ item as it gives you a real sense of how the print would work with certain fabrics. You an also see the print a little closer up here. It’s a combination of large flowers and foliage, with scattered leaves and small daisy like flowers. The colours could easily be adapted for a more autumnal feel, but with the blues included, I could see this piece going into winter too.

I hope you liked this quick little insight into some recent rough designs! You guys requested for me to post some more of these illustrations, so I thought I’d give you just that! I put a quick poll out on Twitter (closed now, I’m afraid) to see if you’d be interested in seeing daily illustrations over fashion week instead of general reviews, and the answer was definitely a yes to illustrations! I’ll let you know how that goes and if I stick to it!

(Reference images)


Would you wear any of these designs? Which is your favourite? Let me know in the comments!

  Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Slow Fashion by Safia Minney

By July 2, 2016 Ethical

I’m going to say something for the 1000th time when it comes to ethical and sustainable fashion; it’s really important to educate yourself.

Slow Fashion by Safia Minney Book Review


SLOW FASHION by Safia Minney


You might be aware of some of the issues surrounding the fashion industry these days, but how much do you really know about what’s being done to make changes? How many real life stories have you listened to? How do you know what to do as a consumer?

These are all questions you should be able to answer easily, but for a lot of people, it’s hard to answer them without saying, “I don’t know” or perhaps, “I don’t know enough to give you an answer”. So yes, I may have said it several times by now, but it really is important. We all need to learn more, so that we’re open and aware about what needs to change… a big emphasis on need, because it really does need to.

So, as a way to educate yourself, I’m going to introduce you to a book that I’ve just finished reading – “Slow Fashion” by founder and CEO of People Tree, Safia Minney. “Slow Fashion” is a book which explores the work which is being done to make the fashion industry more ethical and sustainable, as well inspiring entrepreneurs, creatives and consumers, to think differently and start to make change, no matter how big or small.

Safia has been running People Tree, a leading ethical and sustainable fashion brand for the past 25 years, working alongside designers like Zandra Rhodes to create exciting and ethical collections which not only help the people making them, but the environment and the earth.

Slow Fashion by Safia Minney Book Review

Slow Fashion by Safia Minney Book Review

One of the main themes throughout the book is something that I wanted to share with you, and is something that emphasises my point about educating yourself; small steps lead to bigger things. One of the best ways to explain this is through a quote (from the book) by actress and model, Lily Cole…

“Whenever I am given a choice, I try to make the right one.”

When you learn about some of the issues in the industry, you can be taken aback. For me personally, it was like something clicked and suddenly I had this whole new mind-set (thanks to the wonderful movie which is, The True Cost)… but there are cons to that happening. I ended up putting pressure on myself and started to rush things and try and reevaluate everything I knew before. Although now I see this as a pro, I basically stopped shopping altogether. I felt guilty whenever I wore clothes I knew were unethical, and I tried to change too much of what I could all at one time.

The reason I’m explaining this, is because Lily’s quote uses one specific word; try.

When we learn about all of these issues, for most of us, it’s hard to suddenly change everything. It’s hard to step out of what we can afford or what we are able to do immediately. But it is possible to do in the long run (though of course, the faster the better, as I said; things need to change) and that’s something we mustn’t forget.

Slow Fashion by Safia Minney Book Review

Slow Fashion by Safia Minney Book Review

It’s reassuring to read that even people who are making changes, aren’t always perfect. Sometimes it’s impossible. Not everyone has the freedom and privilege to purchase specifically ethical clothing due to the fact that it’s usually higher in price than normal run of the mill, high-street fashion (don’t forget though, second-hand and vintage clothing is an option). But being aware that there is a choice, is very valuable.

Walking into a shop and asking yourself whether you need an item, or whether you could find a better, more high quality option that will be more sustainable, is so important. And to loop it all back; being aware, means educating yourself, which is why I’m recommending this book.

At the same time as learning more about the issues and effects of fast-fashion and mass consumption, you can discover new brands and labels to shop from, some of which include: Goodsociety, Miss Green, Braintree, Armed Angels, MADE, LeJu, Joanna Cave and Quazi Design.

Slow Fashion by Safia Minney Book Review


Stitched Up: The Anti-Capitalist Book of Fashion by Tansy E. Hoskins


You can also discover other books including the one photographed in this post, “Stitched Up: The Anti-Capitalist Book of Fashion”. I’m only into Chapter 2 and it’s already highly insightful. It not only looks into fast-fashion (both on the high-street and on the catwalk), but it also covers topics like racism and body image. It’s a one of a kind book to add to your reading list! (I’ll be sure to review it when I’m finished).

Also through this book, I’ve discovered the film, “Udita” by Rainbow Collective. It’s an extraordinary and raw insight into the lives of the female factory workers in Bangladesh, most of whom were affected by the Rana Plaza disaster of 2013. One of the most touching moments in the film for me, is when one of the workers is explaining their desires and wishes for the future…

I wish people would buy clothes with a conscience. My desire is that what’s happening now will never be repeated. That people who are buying clothes abroad stop and think about how much they buy for it and how much is the true cost for us here.”

If the workers themselves are saying they wish we could shop with a conscience, then surely that’s enough for us all to implement change, no matter how big or small? The majority of us have a choice. We all have the ability to learn about our choices. Learning is all part of the process, and really, at the most, it can take an hour out of your day to do so.

When you next sit down to binge watch your favourite Netflix show, why not click onto The True Cost (which is on Netflix anyway) or go onto Amazon and order yourself a book, instead? Small steps lead to bigger things, and we can all make them if we try.


What are you going to do to learn more? Have you read Slow Fashion already? Let me know in the comments!

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Starting An Ethical Wardrobe | Sale Shoppping*

By August 25, 2015 Ethical

on a tight budgetAfter launching my Ethical Directory it seemed a bit wrong not to actually shop from it, didn’t it? So when Think Money came to me and asked whether I’d like to do a bit of sale shopping and show you how much money I saved, I thought it was the perfect time to add some more to my ethical wardrobe that is slowly starting to grow. Want to see what I picked up? Carry on reading… 🙂

Ethical Fashion Sale Shopping - ASOS Africa & People Tree Zandra Rhodes
Ethical Fashion Sale Shopping - ASOS Africa & People Tree Zandra Rhodes

~ THE CHALLENGE ~

The task was simple… to go sale shopping and document how much I spent and how much I saved, and it really was quite the challenge. As the benefits of ethical/sustainable fashion often make the price of items go up, it was quite tricky to buy that much with the budget that I had (£50), but I realised, that even with ethical fashion, that’s not the point.

Cutting down on the amount of clothes we buy each year is also a big factor when it comes ethical shopping, on top of making sure those items are produced and manufactured in fair working conditions and with fabrics and materials that are as eco-friendly as they can be. So with 3 items in my basket, I was quite chuffed that I was able to support two brands and the people who made the items.

Ethical Fashion Sale Shopping - ASOS Africa & People Tree Zandra Rhodes

Ethical Fashion Sale Shopping - ASOS Africa & People Tree Zandra Rhodes

~ ASOS AFRICA TROUSERS ~

The first piece that I knew I had to pick up was this pair of ASOS Africa trousers. You may recognise the print as I have already got the matching blouse (you can see me wearing it here and here). I loved the print so much that I knew I needed these to cover up my legs! They’re actually a crepe material which is slightly odd but they’re still super lovely. You can read more about ASOS Africa here, in case you missed it! They were £16 and are going to make a lovely addition to my wardrobe!


Sale Price – £16.00 // Original Price – £45.00 // How Much I Saved – £29.00

Ethical Fashion Sale Shopping - ASOS Africa & People Tree Zandra Rhodes

Ethical Fashion Sale Shopping - ASOS Africa & People Tree Zandra Rhodes

~ ZANDRA RHODES CUBE T-SHIRT ~

The next piece I knew I had to pick up was this oversized top from the “Zandra Rhodes with People Tree” collection. The fact that it was Zandra Rhodes did pull me in a bit more than it should have, but so did the price. On sale it was only £16, so in terms of an ethical and fair-trade item of clothing, it was quite a good deal.

It’s a sort of oversized style top that has quite large, almost batwing, sleeves with this abstract print which reminds me of a mix between a rocket ship and a satellite floating in space. I love these sorts of prints and colours as they mix really well with things like my KENZO shorts (second-hand, woop woop).


Sale Price – £16.00 // Original Price – £40.00 // How Much I Saved – £24.00

Ethical Fashion Sale Shopping - ASOS Africa & People Tree Zandra Rhodes

Ethical Fashion Sale Shopping - ASOS Africa & People Tree Zandra Rhodes

~ LOVE CHARMS NECKLACE ~

Lastly but definitely not least, is this gorgeous little necklace, also from People Tree. I thought it would look perfect with a necklace I have from Accessorize as it has very similar beading and colours. The beads are all glass so it’s actually a lot more sturdy than it may look. I also really like the little “PT” symbol and bird which sit just in the middle. It’s going to be the perfect little layering necklace and a nice reminder that I’m supporting a good cause.

It was made by TARA, a fair-trade group working with artisans in India. TARA has it’s own collection of jewellery with People Tree, all of which are lovely and delicate. What do you think?


Sale Price – £6.00 // Original Price – £14.00 // How Much I Saved – £8.00

I saved… £61.00 in total!

So yes, I saved myself quite a lot pennies didn’t I? Of course with brands like People Tree it’s nice to support them fully, but when you’re a teen like me, or a student, or even if you’re just on a tight budget, saving yourself some money can be a real big help, especially when you want to focus on creating an ethical wardrobe.

I’m chuffed with my purchases and I hope you are too! Let  me know in the comments what you’ve bought in the sales recently! 🙂

(This is a sponsored post in collaboration with Think Money. I was sent £50 to purchase whatever I want. All opinions are 100% honest. You can read my full disclaimer, here.)

  Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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NEW TDP Ethical Directory for Fashion Brands

By August 9, 2015 Ethical

So, whilst I’ve been having a bit of a blogging low, I’ve actually been working behind the scenes on something that I think you guys are going to like! I’ve been asked a few times what ethical brands I recommend since I’ve started talking more ethical fashion, so I thought why not create a list of all of them?

Ethical Directory For Fashion Brands - ASOS Africa, People Tree, Reformation

Ethical Directory For Fashion Brands - ASOS Africa, VILA, VERO MODA

~ TDP’S ETHICAL DIRECTORY ~

Dah-dah! I’ve created an Ethical Directory. A list of brands that I’ve discovered that are all giving back in someway or another, whether that be ethically, sustainably, or both! Some of them I’ve known for a while now, and some of them I’ve only just discovered since working on the list, but either way, I’m sure you’ll enjoy having a browse.

I’ve devised the directory into 7 categories, and they all have handy links so you can get to each of them easily. Have a click on these if you want to go straight to it…


Favourites // Fashion // Accessories & Footwear // High End £££ // Basics // Second-hand // Miscellaneous


Ethical Directory For Fashion Brands - EMG, O MY BAG, Reformation

So far, I have 3 brands/designers per category, which I know doesn’t seem like much, but I thought it would be a good, organised, base to start from. There are 3 images displayed which point to each brand’s website, as well as 3 drop down toggles which have basic information and another, easy, clickable link. Price ranges/dates maybe rough, but I’ve tried to be as clear as possible! 

Some of the brands maybe 100% ethical and sustainable already, and some brands may be on their way, but hopefully this gives you an idea of what is actually out there and makes you start to think before you buy! I really hope to expand the directory and hopefully, you can help too!

Ethical Directory For Fashion Brands - ASOS Africa, Oxfam, People Tree

~ GET INVOLVED ~

If you want to get involved with my new ethical directory, then click on the banner above (or this link). Follow the link to a tweet, and add in your brand name/Twitter handle. I’ll have a peep through the hashtag, #EthicalTDP, and if I find any brands or designers that pick my fancy, I may just add them to my directory. How does that sound?

So, what do you think of my new ethical directory for fashion brands? I really hope you like the idea and that you get involved with making it grow! Don’t forget to comment any ethical brands too; I’d love to know of some more…


Are you a brand who wants to be listed in my Ethical Directory? Head over to my advertising page to learn more. I’m currently offering a small, limited amount of features.


Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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The True Cost Movie | My Thoughts, 40% Off & FREE Download

By June 6, 2015 Fashion

 If you haven’t seen me nattering away on Twitter, then you won’t have seen my tweets about a new documentary film called, The True Cost. I first discovered it on the Business of Fashion YouTube channel (which I would highly recommend subscribing to) and had been waiting for the launch day ever since. I thought I would discuss the movie and what I’ve taken from it, to hopefully inspire you and get you all to watch it. Sorry if this is a long one… if you read all the way you might find a 40% off surprise at the end!

The True Cost Movie - Fashion Documentary - 40% Off Discount Code

The film itself probably isn’t suitable for all age groups. There are a couple of graphic scenes, so please watch at your own risk, or at least ask your parents first if you’re under 13.

First of all, the film in summary: The True Cost is a documentary film about the true costs of fashion. It talks about (what I like to call) ‘diseases’ of the fashion industry. Whether that be in production or in the end, consumption. I do have to admit, it makes your stomach flip inside out. You feel a sense of guilt as you watch what is before your eyes, but I think that it is the only way anyone can get the message across. You may be thinking, why the guilt? What have you done wrong? Well, it depends who you are.

As I just mentioned, the film talks about everything from production to consumption, and I believe it is important to define what we mean by that. What exactly is a ‘consumer’? In my opinion a consumer of (mainly, fast) fashion is somebody who literally, consumes. Its somebody who takes what they can, because they can.

The True Cost Movie - Fashion Documentary - 40% Off Discount Code

I don’t think I am a consumer. I don’t buy things just for the fun of it… I don’t live in a world where I run into a shop on Black Friday screaming because the deals are just SO inviting. I live in a world where I buy what I want when I need it.

Okay I admit, I don’t necessarily need any more clothes, but I never buy things just because. I’m not trying to excuse myself at all… but I do understand the problems in buying dirt cheap. Now that the problems have been put in front of me, I think more about the item and what its been through. I absolutely adore second-hand shopping and actually find it slightly more satisfying when I find something that is my style. Its like a treasure trove… but you’re not just buying, you’re recycling too.

But, I am part of the problem, and you probably are too.

We should all know about the Rana Plaza disaster by now; 1,133 people died (and 2,500 were injured) in 2013 when the factory in Bangladesh collapsed. It was the factory home to many well known western brands including the ‘almighty’ Primarni… I mean, uh, Primark. It was also the workplace of many women (and men) of which provided them with around $50 a month (or much less) and extremely poor living conditions.


CLICK TO TWEET: Share a quote from this post and get even more people involved. Educate as many people about the true cost of fashion…


The True Cost Movie - Fashion Documentary - 40% Off Discount Code

The factory collapsed on April 29th 2013 after several employees noticed cracks appearing on the walls. You may recognise this date as Fashion Revolution Day which started exactly 1 year after the disaster.

If you watch The True Cost, you will soon understand that this is not the only ‘disease’. It isn’t just the fact that Rana Plaza collapsed and killed many, that makes it so important. It’s also the fact that even the fabrics, leathers and materials that go into these cheap clothes, are harmful. Chemicals used on the farms are dangerous, and there are already many cases which show that we could should be doing better.

It has really made me start to think that the industry, including the consumers, just keep putting a one word excuse in front of them… money.

The True Cost Movie - Fashion Documentary - 40% Off Discount Code

If the industry, and all the major companies and corporations really cared about the people, the environment, the future and their credibility, they would stop putting it all down to money. Did you know that a t-shirt in the US would cost 3 cents more if the factory workers in places just like Bangladesh were paid enough to live under standard living conditions?

Yes, there are middle men in between, but if it is over us and the consumers spending a few more pennies, the H&Ms and the ZARAs of the world having to spend a few more too, and mothers in the garment factories having to send their children away because working in a factory is the only answer, meaning their children aren’t being educated or looked after, then that is sickening.


CLICK TO TWEET: Sharing this blog post will already start putting the message across. Spread awareness for the true cost of fashion…


The True Cost Movie - Fashion Documentary - 40% Off Discount Code

That is where my guilt comes in. I’m giving my money to companies that don’t actually care that much about anything other than what goes into their pocket. I don’t shop with them that often, but it really does make me wish I could do more.

Right now, what I can do is influence you, my readers. I can change your view on things, make you watch The True Cost and other documentaries to educate yourself on topics that effect you, the world and many individual families. I can also avoid consuming products from these shops as much as I can (I know that for some of us on tighter budgets, it is harder. It often feels like the only option). I can buy second-hand items which also recycles items that are perfectly usable. I can support and promote brands that are doing all the right things, like People Tree for example.

I know that isn’t much. If I could, I would be doing so much more. You could be too. Think about what you could be doing. Don’t think that what you could be doing as worthless because if we all thought that then we would get nowhere. If we didn’t vote for our favourite contestants on Britain’s Got Talent, then nobody would win. Use your voice and spread the word because you can. Speak for the families and workers who get beaten and killed for wanting something that is totally human and fair.


CLICK TO TWEET: Think about what you could be doing and ask your followers to start joining in too. Change the industry one step at a time…



The True Cost Movie - Fashion Documentary - 40% Off Discount Code

SUBSCRIBE TO MY NEWSLETTER FOR 40% OFF THE TRUE COST & A FREE “Change The Industry” CHECKLIST

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To really get the ball rolling, the creators of The True Cost have given you guys a discount code for 40% off when you buy the movie directly from their site via VHX. To get your discount code, simply subscribe to my newsletter (click the link or use the form above) and in the “Subscription Confirmed” email, there will be a code and also a FREE checklist for you to start changing the industry.

Try and achieve all of the simple tasks on the list! Complete them knowing that even if what you do is small, it’s still making a difference. Tiny grains of sand make up the most luscious beaches, so start small and make this problem become a BIG issue.

It’s not just the companies and brands responsibility, it’s our job too.

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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