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Emotional Sustainability and Why Sentimental Items Have Value

By July 25, 2016 Ethical

We’re all guilty of keeping a piece of clothing or a pair of shoes in our wardrobe simply for the fact it reminds us of a certain time or moment in our lives, right? When it comes to a spring clean, there’s always that one item that you pick up and say, ‘I’ll throw you out one day’ to (yes, I personify my clothes – you’re probably guilty of that too), but never actually get around to doing so. But upon thinking about it, I’ve come to the conclusion that there’s value in sentimental fashion and clothing…

ethical and sustainable fashion - emotional sustainability

My first pair of Dr Martens // My blue Maid of Honour bracelet // A bracelet bought with my mum // My sister’s old ring // My mum’s old ring

The value is that it’s sustainable. Yes, keeping that dress you’ve had for four years is sustainable, because it’s lasting; it’s staying put and not being chucked away or replaced. So, you might not wear it very often, but you might have stopped yourself from buying something similar that one time because you know it’s there. You’re keeping an item and prolonging its worth, and whenever you see it, you’re being thrown back emotionally to a time you loved and appreciated.

There are some items you might own that you never want to lose, so you take extra care of them when you do showcase them to the world. I own a ring (pictured) which my dad originally bought for my mum many moons ago, and I go into a state of panic whenever I can’t find it – Note to self: always check leather jacket pockets.

These items are irreplaceable. They don’t keep up with the trends. They aren’t part of the profit gaining cycle of the industry. They may not even be long lasting items which were made of the best fabrics, but because we want to prolong the memory; we prolong the item.

ethical and sustainable fashion - emotional sustainability

I remember buying this bracelet from a small little shop with my mum.  It was nothing special in the moment, but she treated me to it and it always reminds me of that day. 

There are also those items that one day you might want to pass onto your children (just like my mum did with that ring). If you buy something of value and quality, it’s more likely to last longer, meaning you can pass it on in the future. Buying an expensive watch which will last several years, gives you that option to then pass it on to your child. “But it will probably be broken by then” I hear you say… repairs are an option, which is exactly why DIY fashion is promoted as sustainable.

For me, I’m clinging on to my first pair of Dr Martens. It sounds ridiculous, but yes, one day I hope that I can pass them on. They’ll remind me of a time in my life and how much I treasured them, and because I know they are of a certain quality (okay, not necessarily of an ethical and environmentally friendly quality), I know that they are going to last just that bit longer and I know that they can carry on being sustainable for much longer than a pair of shoes I could buy some time in the future. They were second hand, they’re being sustained, they can be repaired, and they will be passed on again. It’s a much more beneficial cycle than that of something new and temporary… which brings me to the idea of the sustainable fashion industry as a whole…

ethical and sustainable fashion - emotional sustainability

This silver necklace used to also be my mum’s and I hold it very close to my heart (a pun which was very much intended).

Sustainable fashion is about stepping out of the profitable cycle of fast fashion, and stepping into the cycle of clothes and items that last longer than the trend they were produced for. Fast fashion is all about trends and keeping things ticking along. To quote a line from ‘Stitched Up by Tansy Hoskins‘ (that I will be reviewing soon) – “It is a commodity cycle of newness that makes clothes go out-of-date and keeps retailers in business.”

Sustainable fashion has no sell-by-date or best-before label. It lasts. Buying a product which is made of higher quality fabrics and has been crafted in a way that not only prolongs the item, but prolongs the wellbeing of the earth, is going to be so much more beneficial to everyone (and the children that it gets passed on to).

The idea and meaning behind what a sustainable item is doing, brings us back to sentimentality. If consumers start to be aware of where their clothes are being made and by whom, they’ll start to appreciate their items and will stop seeing them as disposable items. We all need to start seeing our clothes and fashion as a whole as something that lasts longer than one season and a few weeks on a rack. If a moment can keep us clinging on for years, then the stories and effects of what we’re buying should be able to, too.

What’s one item you’re sustaining for sentimental reasons? Have you bought anything specifically sustainable recently? Let me know in the comments!


I hope you’ve been liking my posts recently. I feel like I’m back in the blogging game and really know where I’m going with it. I also hope you liked these pictures in this post! I’ve discovered that I’m in love with ‘Scanography‘ (the art of using a scanner as your camera) and I absolutely love the look and feel of them. I’ll talk to you soon!

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Why Using Your Blog Audience to Make Change Is So Important

By July 21, 2016 General

The word ‘influencer’ has started to creep into my vocabulary recently, because I’ve come to the conclusion (along with the media/press) that bloggers (including myself) are now much more than just bloggers. We’re influencers.

influencing your blog audience - teen blogger Tolly Dolly Posh


WHAT I WORE: Faux Leather Jacket (DIY & Peacocks) // Maxi Dress (ASOS) // Floppy Hat (ASOS) // Rings (Unknown


Bought something you’ve seen a blogger wearing? They influenced that decision. Had an opinion changed by a blogger you read every day? They’re influencing your thoughts. That sounds rather 1984/Big Brother levels of scary, but if we can be influenced by brands and magazines in that 1984 scary way, then there is nothing to stop us from being influenced by bloggers (again – including myself), just the same.

I’m not here to talk about beauty standards and societal conformities and that kind of influence though. I’m here to talk about positive influence and my irritation over the fact that Not. Enough. Bloggers. Are. Using. Their. Audiences. To. Make. Change.

I can’t say I’m perfect. I haven’t spoken about racism in the fashion industry, or politics (but I guess with that one I’d be expected to talk about Theresa May’s shoes, wouldn’t I?) on my blog before, and I’m not making petitions and getting you all to sign it, but I am doing my small part in sharing my views and opinions on certain things, specifically ethical and sustainable fashion, and how fast fashion is getting kind of old. So, I am doing something… but just the odd blogger, here and there, in my opinion, isn’t enough.

influencing your blog audience - teen blogger Tolly Dolly Posh

I’m not here trying to guilt anyone who is a blogger, but I hope that you will agree with me saying that there is a need and lack of bloggers using their audiences to make change happen. Perhaps my frustration comes from the fact that I’m not a huge blogger… yes, okay, I have a few magazine features under my belt (way to blow your own trumpet, Tolly) but I am nothing in comparison to the superstar YouTubers and followed-by-200k-on-Twitter bloggers, yet I am trying my best to put out a message that will only reach a few hundred. These bloggers, with a power and influence that they know they have, could be doing massive amounts to change the minds of literally thousands (if not, millions) of people. But they’re not. Why? Well, that’s the answer I want to figure out.

I’ve seen a few arguments to this question, including ‘It wouldn’t fit in with my aesthetic/blog topic’ and ‘I want my blog to be a place to escape’, or even, ‘There’s somebody else already doing it’. They’re all valid, and if that’s what you believe, then it’s your blog; sure, stick with that. But think about the possibilities of what you could be doing.

If you get comments on your posts, it’s because somebody has taken the time to read the majority of the words within it (and finds it worthy of adding to). That means that somebody is listening to you. Somebody is being influenced by you. Even if it’s just one… that’s somebody who could learn about something important and topical, that they might not have thought about before.

influencing your blog audience - teen blogger Tolly Dolly Posh

Let’s take me and ethical fashion, for example. I’ve had quite a lot of readers commenting on my blog and saying ‘I never really knew about this before, I’m definitely going to learn more’, which is exactly what I want whenever I talk about it. So what if a blogger with 100 times the amount of readers as I have, spoke about the same issues? That would be 100 times more the amount of people being influenced.

The argument of ‘It wouldn’t fit in with my aesthetic/blog topic’ is a bit of a weak one for me personally. It takes me back to one of the reasons I even wrote this post – Vivienne Westwood (and Ian Kelly)’s book about Vivienne’s life and career. You probably already know, but Vivienne works closely with climate change and combines fashion and her activism into one. When she spoke about this in the book, she said that everything is connected, it’s just finding a way to comfortably connect it that can become a struggle… but, it can be done.

Obviously, if there’s no cause or topic you feel worthy of talking about, then don’t force it just to influence people. Talk about something that you are passionate about and believe in strongly. If you’re a beauty blogger, you can still talk about such topics as ethical and sustainable fashion, because fashion links in with beauty and trends and how consumerism and capitalism do their part. If you’re a book blogger, talk about books which discuss these types of topics.

influencing your blog audience - teen blogger Tolly Dolly Posh

~ HOW TO SPREAD A MESSAGE ~

 Tweet about it
 Retweet other people’s tweets
 Use Facebook to post lengthier updates (there’s no 140 character limit!)
 Blend in subtle messages within other blog posts
✓ Write a mission statement for your about page

 Ask your readers questions about the topic
 If you’re not; admit that you’re not perfect (especially with things such as ethical shopping etc)
 Bring your readers along on your journey
 If it’s important to you – let it be important

Whatever kind of blogger you are – you have an audience that listens, trusts and is influenced by you, so you may as well use that to your advantage. Even if you don’t do it on your actual blog, speaking up about things on social media is important too, because it is even more easily shareable, which means the people you are influencing can then influence their friends and family and their own audiences.

I think it probably hits home to me so much because ethical and sustainable fashion now seems to me, unquestionable. I don’t really understand why more people aren’t talking about it. I’d love for people who do have bigger audiences than me, to start spreading the same awareness. Especially those who have millions of beady eyes watching. I’ve only seen a couple of people who have started to do this, like CutiePieMarzia, who worked on the Fashion Revolution ‘#Haulternative’ campaign, and more recently, Tanya Burr, who is working on the Global Goals campaign which focuses on gender equality worldwide.

The most important part about people such as Tanya spreading these messages, is the fact that she is reaching out to teens. Younger people are being fed knowledge and are starting to question things because someone they watch and admire is telling them that it’s important. She’s using her influence, and really – it’s just that simple.

If you’ve been contemplating writing a post about a topic that is close to your heart, then write it. Use the power you have at your fingertips. If just one person reads it and decides to learn even more, that’s one person you’ve influenced. That’s one more person who might just go off and change the world (even if that sounds rather over the top).


Let me know in the comments what you’d like to see influencers talking about, and how you think it can be done!

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Health In The Modelling Industry

By October 3, 2013 Fashion

Bonjourno young chums. I haven’t done an ‘opinionated’ post in a while have I? Well, I’m back with one, and this post is going to be full of one very strong opinion I have. I’m sorry if I come across rather angry…. but I am rather angry (you’ll see why)…

health in the modelling industry georgina wilkin

This morning I saw a tweet which linked to a Daily Mail article, I had no idea what it was, but I clicked. I scrolled down, reading every single word, and was horrified. The article was all about, now former model, Georgina Wilkin. Georgina was scouted on Oxford Street at just 15 (2 years older than me). When she was half way through her GCSEs, she was asked to model for a Japanese agent, but she was told that she had to lose 3 inch from her hips and 1 inch from her waist. Georgina was drawn in and she started to lose the weight, her diet consisted of salad, vegetables and sometimes days without food. Before she started modelling, she weighed 8st 6lb, which shows that she was ‘slim’. I can relate to this because I am ‘slim’ and I have been told I am underweight before, but I was/and still am, perfectly healthy, and I am sure Georgina was too. Even though she was this weight, every 2 weeks she would be weighed and measured and told to lose more weight. Georgina said in the article… ”The skinnier girls, got all the bookings and I was even told I wouldn’t be able to work for jewellery companies because my fingers were too fat.” Georgina became thinner, weaker and started to get ill whilst she was in Tokyo. She was getting blue lips and hands because her heart was struggling. When she returned, she worked with brands including TopshopGAP, and Giles Deacon, where apparently, nobody ate. In 2007, she was diagnosed with Anorexia. (See the full article here.)

health in the modelling industry georgina wilkin

Now obviously, we can’t believe everything the Daily Mail says (and also you could say that it was her parents fault), because everything is made to attach to our heart strings, but I honestly do think that if you read the article, you will understand where I am coming from when I say that I am… disgusted. Totally, utterly disgusted. I’m not disgusted because it is the fashion industry, I am disgusted that the industry thinks it’s okay to let this carry on, for their own good. It’s not even mean, I personally think it’s pure ‘evil’. Imagine looking at a girl who is obviously ‘thin’ and going, ‘You’re too fat’ (well, maybe not those exact words, but you know what I mean!). It’s bonkers. DEE-SGUST-ING. Models becoming ill for brands to get more money? Sounds a bit cruel in my books.

Some people will say ‘Well just don’t model then’. The fashion industry, could not and will not survive with out models. I’m fine with models, I’m fine with that, just not the whole ‘If your not a size 8, you’re not good enough’ attitude. There needs to be change. I don’t think saying you have to be Size 8 or more, is the right way to do it, but I think there needs to be a more healthy way of looking at it. Thinking about health, and being HUMAN more than just creating a good picture to get money. We don’t want ill models, and we certainly don’t want young girls looking up to ill models, do we? No, I thought not. I’m going to have to say it, but the modelling agencies are almost… killing what they are doing in a way. They hire models, and tell them that they are too big. The models go away and lose more weight, come back and are ill, and in Georgina’s case, come even close to losing their own life, so the agency has to chose another girl (or boy), and it goes on and on. Disgusting.

What do you think? Do you think something needs to change? Let me know in the comments!

(Images found: here and here)

  Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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