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How Millennials and Generation Z Can Become More Ethical

By March 21, 2017 Ethical

A common theme when I asked around for some questions and blog post ideas after racking my brain for days, ended up being about the younger generation and ethical fashion. Of course, that’s rather relevant seeing as I’m part of what some would class as “Generation Z”; the not-quite millennials.

Ethical Fashion for Millennials and Generation Z - Fashion Revolution


FEATURED: Clarabella Bag £33.00 (What Daisy Did)* // Zhandra Rhodes Top (People Tree) // Fashion Revolution Instagram // Bluetooth Speaker (UE Roll)* // Nike Trainers (old – JD Sports)*


Whenever I talk about my generation and being a teen today, I always have to reiterate how my experience isn’t necessarily the bog-standard norm for people my age and for people in let’s say, the UK. Without trying to sound pretentious, the situations I’ve been put into have opened me up to alternative ways of living and viewing different aspects of life, especially in more recent times. This doesn’t, however, mean that I’m oblivious to teen culture. My earliest blog posts are an insight into that with my focus on celebrity style and bargain buys; I’ve lived that but now my eyes have been opened.

And I think that’s a good segue into the core of this blog post. I was talking to someone recently about social media and how it plays a part in teenagers and politics and it brought to head my true opinion on what I believe about our age group. On the one hand, I couldn’t be happier that we have so many incredible platforms to play with and use right at our fingertips.

It’s opened up so many different conversations and gives us the ability to be inundated with unique angles and perspectives that we wouldn’t necessarily get anywhere else. We have the freedom to learn about whatever we want and talk to whoever we want and express whatever we want and I don’t see why anyone should be complaining about that.

Ethical Fashion for Millennials and Generation Z - Fashion Revolution

In my mind, the problem which comes with that, is the idea of sitting back and letting everyone else do the work. It’s extremely easy to think that there are enough active people and citizens out there because when we refresh the page, there’s something new from them. There’s a huge difference between being a participant in what is going on around us and actually being part of what is going on around us. I’m not just saying this relates to teens and young adults; we all know

I’m not just saying this relates to teens and young adults; we all know from these platforms that there are plenty of older people who like to talk but not do, but if I’m going to relate this to ethical issues in particular, then I believe this is one of the stumbling blocks we face.

The younger generations are much more aware of the issues and that’s hugely important because it means they are being informed and influenced in some way. The more the issues to do with, say, the fast-fashion industry are discussed, the more we’ll start to question things and wonder if we’re part of the problem. Being actively involved in changing our ways is perhaps a little harder but this all seems to stem from old habits.

When I started my blog at age 11, I used to go into high-street shops with the main objective of buying as much as I could with the £10 note in my hand. An unsuccessful shopping trip would be one which left me close to empty-handed. The thrill of buying as much as you can with as little as possible is understanding, especially when you’re younger and money is sparse.

Ethical Fashion for Millennials and Generation Z - Labour Behind the Label

I treasure money like gold now, understanding and knowing it’s true value; saving up for investments, my future and experiences rather than anything too materialistic, unlike when I was younger and it was a fun thing to use and play with. I’d buy t-shirts and dresses in the sale for prices as little as £3 and I’d be utterly satisfied. I can only believe that this was because due being brought up on the idea of more meaning more, due to western society, consumption and commercialism (wow, that’s a big sentence).

Unfortunately, I think this is still true of many younger people and as I said, it has a lot to do with money. When you’re a teen, you’re either saving for the future or you’re struggling to even put together a double-figure number, so when it comes to clothes and it comes to accessible products to buy, the cheapest option is always going to be easiest and on the surface, seem more worthwhile.

This especially true when you add the ‘millennial’ mindset on top of that; according to a study by the Harris Group, 72% of millennials would now prefer to spend money on experiences rather than physical products. This doesn’t mean we aren’t buying physical products, it just means we’d rather spend less and save the bulk for travelling and experiencing new opportunities. We’re definitely not avoiding buying physical products – it’s hard to imagine somebody going on a vacation or heading to a festival without buying new clothes to wear nowadays, isn’t it?

Ethical Fashion for Millennials and Generation Z - Fashion Revolution

Getting people out of this mindset and into a more conscious one is a little difficult when ethical fashion, unfortunately, has a stigma of being more expensive. I’m going to say this rather bluntly; ethical fashion isn’t more expensive if you stop buying as much as you usually would. The only reason ethical fashion is known to be expensive is because one piece can often be the price of two fast-fashion pieces. It’s why it often gets referred to as ‘slow fashion’. It’s about consuming more slowly and considerately; saving the money you would spend on a handful of trend focused pieces, for fewer, more long lasting and of course, ethically and sustainably made items.

Once our mindsets have been changed, ethical fashion won’t be expensive. It will be the way we shop. The industry will move and we’ll head in a more positive direction as a whole. We have to start thinking about it differently but unfortunately, just reading headlines and taking in tweets isn’t going to change anything drastically. Just being aware doesn’t cut it anymore.

So, how exactly, especially as part of the younger generation, do we go about changing our ways and become more actively involved in making positive actions happen?

Ethical Fashion for Millennials and Generation Z - Fashion Revolution

Change your mindset…

Start believing that less is more. Conscious consumerism may not be the final answer to change how the industry works, but it’s one of the easiest ways to start getting involved. This wonderful quote by Anna Lappe which I’ve included before on my blog says it all, ‘Every time you spend money, you’re casting a vote for the kind of world you want’. Use your vote more wisely. Think about whether you’ll actually end up using or wearing something you buy. Be conscious not just aware.

Help others change their mindset too…

If you’re out shopping with someone; why not ask them questions? Get them to think about why they’re buying each item. You don’t have to pressure them or fill them with a sense of guilt by showing them screenshots of a collapsed factory (that’s a bit extreme) but introducing this thought-process gradually is a big step. It will also make you truly appreciate everything you touch and feel. I can no longer go into a shop without questioning things now. I’m always asking where? Who? How?

For a slightly more extreme approach, take look at Craftivist Collective’s ‘Mini Fashion Statements’ idea.

Take part in Fashion Revolution…

If we’re a generation that thrives on getting ourselves out there and getting stuck in with new and exciting experiences, then physically taking part in some form of activism can be a great place to start.

Fashion Revolution was created after the Rana Plaza disaster in 2013, and now pushes for change within the industry throughout the whole year but especially during the month of April. Take a look at their website and see if there are any events on in your area that you can be a part of. It’s a global event as well, so there’s nothing stopping you from finding an event in your country or even.

Ethical Fashion for Millennials and Generation Z - Labour Behind the Label

Get answers…

It’s all well and good celebrating when a brand answers a broad question about how they run in terms of ethics and sustainability, but actually asking the questions yourself and pushing them constantly will make them aware that change is needed. One of the questions I’m currently trying to ask is directed at Jack Wills. They recently released the news that they would be openly sharing where their products are manufactured, on their website, but I have yet to easily find this list and in my opinion, that’s a little disappointing.

Since publishing this post, Jack Wills have tweeted me with a link to their “Fabric of Jack” campaign.

So, if you’re curious – ask. Curiosity doesn’t kill the cat in this scenario, it leads to something more positive. This also links in with Fashion Revolution and the #WhoMadeMyClothes campaign.

Donate to those who are helping directly…

Initiatives like Labour Behind The Label are striving to help those affected by the issues in the fast-fashion industry, protecting, supporting and empowering garment workers worldwide. They have some incredible campaigns running which you can donate to in order to support their wider work. Donating can help Labour Behind The Label put pressure on brands, support those have been exploited and overall, help us move forward in making the industry a more positive space.

What do you think Millennials and Generation Z could be doing better in terms of ethics? How are you being more active? Let me know in the comments!

  Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Why YouTube Haul Videos Don’t Have to Be Problematic

By March 12, 2017 Ethical, YouTube

For those of you know aren’t familiar with the term ‘haul video’, here’s a brief description. A haul on YouTube is a video showcasing someone’s recently purchased items. They’re hugely successful especially when it comes to fashion, with some videos receiving views in the millions. The problematic side of this comes down to the frequency of uploads and the vast amount of people being influenced by them; it’s the opposite of celebrating conscious consuming.

Fashion Revolution & the Issue with Youtube Haul Videos - fashion haulternative

I don’t want this to be a negative, guilt-inducing article because I too, at one point, was an avid haul-watching-aholic. In fact, I used to upload haul videos myself back when I was somewhat active on YouTube (meaning I am part of the 21,500,000 videos on YouTube including the word ‘haul’ in the title). I’m not here to tell you to stop watching them or to stop making them, in fact, I’m going to avoid that completely; hence the title. But, just to continue on from my introduction, I will expand on why it doesn’t match up with what I believe should be more beneficial to us.

Haul videos promote consumption, and that’s just a fact nobody can avoid. The reason for haul videos isn’t just to spread the love of what we own, it’s to spread the love of what we own for somebody else to then enjoy by purchasing it themselves. It’s also not even about that anymore due to the rise of influencer marketing where products are paid to be featured in them or they’d been paid for by a brand in hopes of a feature, too.

If you’ve read my blog post about using your audience for change, you’ll know how important I believe the word ‘influencer’ is and how relevant it is to what I have to say in this post, too.

Fashion Revolution & the Issue with Youtube Haul Videos - Marzia Haulternative


~ CLOTHES SWAP ~


With haul videos being so influential in what we buy, especially within the younger generations, they can be problematic if we’re going to make sustainability a priority. It’s also problematic if the brands being promoted are perhaps not as ethical as we might like because they gain interest and that sends a signal to them that they’re ‘working’ or that they’re successful.

There’s a great quote by Anna Lappe which is, “Every time you spend money, you’re casting a vote for the kind of world you want.”, and I think it rings true for how we approach influence as well. Every time you promote a brand, you’re casting a vote for what kind of world you want other people to cast a vote for too.

So, why do I think haul videos don’t have to be problematic? It’s once again all to do with influence and the message put across. Although I’ve been wanting to write about this topic for a while now, the final push came when I watched one of Marzia (CutiePieMarzia)’s videos; a haul video, to be precise. Throughout the whole video she touched on ethics, even if it was just showing a brand’s core values and towards the end, she explained it all in further detail, explaining why buying items you truly love is more important than buying items you’ll only wear a handful of times even if they’re not necessarily ethical in the first place.

As much as I want to promote ethical shopping, it can be a difficult transition to make but this is a really great starting place not only for us, the viewers but also for content creators and how they approach these topics gradually and naturally.

Fashion Revolution & the Issue with Youtube Haul Videos - Marzia Haulternative


~ HAULTERNATIVE ~


One of the reasons I picked out Marzia specifically is because she has a large audience and if we’re going to talk about influence then we should talk about those who can influence the most. It’s really refreshing to see somebody at least opening the conversation, which I think we could do with a lot more of. On the grand scheme of things, no reputations would be harmed and brands aren’t going to back away from working with someone if they’re only naturally introducing a concept. In my opinion, there’s nothing to lose.

Another great example of someone with a wide audience is Liv from What Olivia Did. I’ve been a huge fan of Liv’s blog for years now but recently she did a post all about consumerism and it was honest. She didn’t make herself out to be anything more than she is, and that’s something we should value when it comes to these issues. We need transparency across the board.

These two examples are just small ways haul videos and fashion content can become less consumption based. I think constantly dropping in ideas and mentions of what we all need to work towards is actually sometimes more important and influential than huge statements once in a while. Consistency and commitment to a message are key.

Fashion Revolution & the Issue with Youtube Haul Videos - Tolly Dolly Posh Love Story


~ SUBSCRIBE TO FASHION REVOLUTION ~


There are other ways, though, which takes me back to Marzia once again because, over the past couple of years, she’s taken part in Fashion Revolution’s #Haulternative campaign which focuses on exactly what I’m talking about; more positive and conscious consumption. Fashion Revolution have a wide range of content ideas for when Fashion Revolution day comes around, which I would highly recommend taking a look at if you are a blogger or influencer yourself.

One of these #Haulternative ideas is one I participated in and uploaded myself. The idea of a ‘Love Story’ haul involves sharing items of clothing you’ve had in your wardrobe for longer than just a few days. It’s still technically a haul because you’re sharing a collection of products, but it’s about sharing the idea of rekindling the love you originally had for them. It’s also about sentimentality (you can read more about how that’s important to sustainability here) and prolonging the number of times you use and wear something.

Fashion Revolution & the Issue with Youtube Haul Videos - Tanya Burr Most Worn Items


~ MOST WORN ~


A video which wasn’t directly for Fashion Revolution but was along the same vein was by Tanya Burr. She posted a video about the most worn items in her wardrobe and even if the products and brands she was promoting weren’t necessarily ethical, she was engaging with the concept that clothes can last.

All of the messages add up and contribute to a more positive influence online. We just need more people to participate and learn more themselves. I will say it for the 783rd time – education is vital and is something we all need and can do with more of. I’m still learning about how to become a better shopper and a better influencer. Why don’t we start thinking about how we all can, too?


Do you think YouTube hauls are problematic? What hauls have you seen which are more positive? Let me know in the comments! Let’s discuss…

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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How To Support Fashion Revolution Day… 18th – 24th April

By April 17, 2016 Ethical

So as you will know from the past couple of years, I’m a big supporter of Fashion Revolution, so this is just a quick reminder for those of you who are new around here (or just new to Fashion Revolution Day in general)… it’s also a great way to refresh your mind on how to support the campaign even if you’ve joined in before…

How to Support Fashion Revolution Day - April 18th - 24th 2016

How to Support Fashion Revolution Day - April 18th - 24th 2016

On the 24th April 2013, 1,134 people were killed and over 2,500 were injured when the Rana Plaza complex collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. That’s when Fashion Revolution was born. The campaign and it’s supporters believe that 1,134 is too many people to lose from the planet in one factory on one terrible day to not stand up and demand change.

On 24 April every year, Fashion Revolution Day brings people from all over the world together to use the power of fashion to change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes. Fashion needs to become a force for good. The aim is to transform the fashion industry into a transparent one and that all starts with the question… who made my clothes?

How to Support Fashion Revolution Day - April 18th - 24th 2016

One of the main ways to get involved is through social media, asking the all important #whomademyclothes hashtag. Send a picture or selfie of your clothes, inside out, with the label showing and tweet the brand, to ask who made it. Keep trying if you don’t receive an answer – it should be an easy question to answer for all brands, no matter how big or small. Here’s an example tweet (click to use it!)…


I’m [name] and I want to thank the people who made my [clothes] Hi @ [brand] #whomademyclothes? @Fash_Rev


If you’re a blogger, then make use of the resources on the Fashion Revolution site to make up your own images for your blog and social media. Spread the word to as many of your followers as possible!

How to Support Fashion Revolution Day - April 18th - 24th 2016

If you’re out and about shopping over the next week (and well… anytime), make sure to hit up your local charity, vintage and second hand shops! Don’t be scared… just go in, take a look and save some money! Change your mindset… think about where your clothes are coming from and how they effect the world we’re living in, and the people in it. Don’t buy something just because it’s cheap – think about the alternatives. DIY and revamping is also included! It all counts.


TDP Archive: The Importance of Second Hand Shopping // Starting An Ethical Wardrobe // Ethical Directory


How to Support Fashion Revolution Day - April 18th - 24th 2016

One of the biggest and most important things to do is… educate yourself! Learn more about why these sorts of issues are effecting the fashion industry. If you wear clothes, then you should know about wear they come from and what happens after we let them go, right? Right. One of the best documentaries that I can personally recommend, is The True Cost. I’ve written about it before, but I don’t mind bringing it up again. Please watch it and let me know what you learnt!



Reading Material: The Label Doesn’t Tell The Whole Story // Rana Plaza // The Plastic Age


Let me know if you get any responses from your favourite brands in the comments! Let’s do this together!

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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The Importance of Second Hand Shopping for Fashion Revolution Day 2015

By April 23, 2015 Ethical

Tomorrow (24th April 2015) is Fashion Revolution Day! If you’re not sure what that is, well I’m here to explain. Fashion Revolution is a campaign to raise awareness of the true cost of fashion, show the world that change is possible, and celebrate all those involved in creating a more sustainable future. I’m quite passionate about the whole thing and I believe you should be too. There’s quite a good explanation over on Huffington Post too!

~ SUBSCRIBE ON YOUTUBE ~

As part of Fashion Revolution Day this year, they’re trying to get as many bloggers, writers, YouTubers and influencers to share a “#Haulternative” video or blog post. The idea is to inspire as many people as possible to get back into the charity shops, raid through jumble sales, purchase vintage gems and think more about expensive, quality, investment buys than huge hauls of cheap and cheerful items.  I think it’s such a great idea and it shouldn’t just be aimed at bloggers either; YOU should get involved too.

You can watch my #Haulternative video above. I’ve picked out a few of my favourite second hand items. Some of them were seriously cheap and look seriously cool among most of my wardrobe. If you are inspired by this video and blog post, make sure to let me know in the comments! I’d love to know what you purchase…

fashion revolution day - second hand shopping

I didn’t want to just talk about some of my favourite pieces though, I wanted to talk about why second hand shopping is actually really important. In my opinion so many people shy away from charity shops and jumble sales because I suppose the idea is a little bit odd. You’re wearing something that a stranger has already worn before. I get it. It is kinda’ weird, but when you think about the positives of buying second hand, you’ll probably want to go shopping straight away…

fashion revolution day - second hand shopping

You’re helping the environment…

Clothes that you pick up from the charity shops and vintage stalls have been worn before, and they’re there to be worn again. It’s fashion’s way of recycling. This stops clothes from being chucked into the landfill sites and being completely wasted. A perfectly usable pair of jeans could be sat there in your local Oxfam waiting to be worn again! If you remember that you’re helping the planet and reducing waste when you purchase, then you should be able to forget that someone else has worn the same jeans.

Second hand clothes come with a purse-friendly price tag…

Unless you’re shopping at a top end vintage designer store, most second hand items will be cheap as chips. You can watch my video just to see a few of the bargains which I have picked up. I mean, who can resist £1 KENZO shorts?! The more expensive charity shops tend to be those with higher quality, more interesting pieces but even then you probably won’t be spending more than £25, which in my opinion is still a bargain. So if you’re on a budget, get down to your town’s weekly car-boot sale and find something for less!

Purchasing items at charity shops and jumble sales doesn’t just help your wardrobe…

It’s in the name, “charity” shops! When you buy, you support a good cause. I’ve listed below just some of the places your money goes at popular charity shops across the UK…

…but don’t just think only charity shops help! Things like car-boot sales and jumble sales help your community! Even on eBay, you help somebody out by putting a few coins back into their purse 🙂

Oxfam

Oxfam spends it’s donations on… emergency response, campaigning for change and development work. 

Sue Ryder

Sue Ryder spends it’s donations on… hospice and neurological care for people facing frightening and life changing conditions. 

Red Cross

British Red Cross spends it’s donations on… first aid care for global emergencies. 

Heart Foundation

British Heart Foundation spends it’s donations on… live-saving research for heart conditions. 

Cancer Research

Cancer Research spends it’s donations on… researching ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer.  

 

Most pieces are as good as new…

As I mentioned above, a pair of perfectly usable jeans might be out there waiting for you, but not just jeans! I’ve found so many pieces (like the ones in my video) that are in perfect condition and look as good as new. So you don’t have to worry about anyone thinking you shop second hand… and if you do feel worried, or anyone does mention it, direct them to this blog post and explain why it’s much better to be wearing someone else’s clothes than something brand spanking new!

fashion revolution day - second hand shopping


Ask the brands you wear #WhoMadeMyClothes Share your #Haulternative


Those are only a few of the amazing positives of shopping second hand. I hope it has inspired you in some way! I definitely want to start buying more second hand pieces, because you really can find some brilliant pieces in your price range. And, if you do, make sure you not only share your #Haulternative shopping spree, but make sure you tweet the brand that is on the label with #WhoMadeMyClothes to see where it came from! Now go and get spreading the word!

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Fashion Revolution Day – #InsideOut

By April 11, 2014 Fashion

Today I have a special post, which I really really hope you get involved with. If you don’t know, April 24th is Fashion Revolution Day which is exactly 1 year after the Rana Plaza disaster. I’m here to tell you more about the special day, and how you can get involved to raise awareness in the fashion industry…

inside out fash rev9 inside out fash rev1 inside out fash rev3What I Wore #InsideOut: Neon Embroidered Blouse with Drop Hem (ASOS), Printed Dress (Primark), H.Morgan Denim Jacket (Jumble Sale), Pastel Chain Necklaces (Rings & Tings)* & Blue Jelly Sandals (Sun Jellies)*

Last year on April 24th in Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1133 people were killed when the Rana Plaza factory complex collapsed, many more were injured. The textile industry is widely regarded as a major contributor to global pollution but, according to research by Deloitte, 2 in 3 fashion companies are not focused on engaging consumers with regard to sustainability. According to the Australian Fashion Report in 2013 61% of companies surveyed didn’t know where their garments were made. Fashion Revolution, says enough is enough, and I totally agree. It’s time we do know where our wardrobe came from! I know I don’t feel comfortable in buying clothes made by children my age, and by people in crumbling buildings, and YOU can help. YOU can do something. YES, YOU!

inside out fash rev5inside out fash rev2

This is what Fashion Revolution want YOU to do….

Wear a piece of clothing (or an outfit!) ‘#InsideOut‘ and share it around with the hashtag #InsideOut including @Fash_Rev and @TollyDollyPosh (I want to see it too!)

Tweet and share your picture with the brand that it comes from, and ask them ‘Who Made My Clothes?’ again with the #InsideOut hashtag

There are going to be events at Somerset House, as well as a mass catwalk in Barcelona, a fashion show in Bangladesh and in Nepal. This isn’t just a local thing, Fashion Revolution is a global project, and I hope you get stuck in!

inside out fash rev7 inside out fash rev6 I’m going to be tweeting throughout the day to as many brands as possible that I have worked with in the past, or whoever! I want to try my best to help this cause because I am very passionate about it. If you are a blogger, you can also check out the course I have made on Bundle where you can learn more about the cause, and gain points on your Bundle account. More modules will be added, but for now go check it out! It will only take you 30 minutes at the most.

Please please please check out Fashion Revolution because everyone wears clothes, so it is something we should all be getting involved with. I hope to see lots of you tweeting on April 24thIf you liked this post, you can nominate me as Best Teen Style Blog here! Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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