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christopher raeburn

Christopher Raeburn for Save The Duck SS18 Presentation | Pitti Uomo 92

By June 19, 2017 Ethical

If you missed my latest post then you won’t have seen that I recently attended Pitti Uomo 92, in Florence this past week. The event is dedicated to menswear and is an opportunity for buyers and press to scope out what is coming up for the next season. Today I wanted to focus on one of my Pitti highlights, the Save The Duck x Christopher Raeburn collection…

christopher raeburn x save the duck ss18 presentation pitti uomo 92

christopher raeburn x save the duck ss18 presentation pitti uomo 92

christopher raeburn x save the duck ss18 presentation pitti uomo 92


locationLOCATION: Pitti Uomo 92
Villa Vittoria, Florence, Italy 🇮🇹


Both Save the Duck and Christopher Raeburn have very similar messages within their two brands, so, of course, this and their previous collaboration are a perfect fit. With outerwear being Save the Duck’s main focus, the collection is a range of lightweight jackets and coats made with recycled fabrics and animal-free innovations like Save the Duck’s ‘Plumtech’ material that lines and pads.

The theme is clear, of course, with camouflage prints in different colours (blue and orange), in an almost patchwork like style. Paired with Bruno Bordese shoes and Entre Amis trousers, the scenery matched the whole look of the presentation – a garden in the city. Natural prints with a more modern and urban twist.

christopher raeburn x save the duck ss18 presentation pitti uomo 92

christopher raeburn x save the duck ss18 presentation pitti uomo 92

christopher raeburn x save the duck ss18 presentation pitti uomo 92

For those of you who don’t know, Christopher Raeburn focuses on sustainability within his luxury design and following the brand on social media makes it extra clear that supporting them isn’t something to question if we want to see more consciously created collections on the catwalk.

Save the Duck are also a brand that heavily focuses on sustainability being their message with a more prominent interest in being animal-free. Their products don’t use ordinary duck feathers for lining and their upcoming summer collection is made of all recycled materials, just like this collaboration. You can probably tell how excited I was to see the two brands come together, up close and personal.

christopher raeburn x save the duck ss18 presentation pitti uomo 92

christopher raeburn x save the duck ss18 presentation pitti uomo 92

christopher raeburn x save the duck ss18 presentation pitti uomo 92


FOLLOW SAVE THE DUCK // FOLLOW CHRISTOPHER RAEBURN


And although this post may be dedicated to the clothes themselves, I have to say that meeting and talking to Christopher briefly made me feel even more inspired by his work. He’s genuinely down to earth and I felt a swell of British pride to experience some of his work, even if it was all the way out in Italy.

The new Christopher Raeburn for Save The Duck collection will be available in select luxury stores in collaboration with the showroom Tomorrow. And, if I am correct, with this being the final collection between the two brands for the near future, I wish them all the success. They’re both sustainable brands we should be championing…

What do you think of the collection? Let me know in the comments…

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Is Menswear Sustainable? | Pitti Uomo 92

By June 16, 2017 Fashion

If you haven’t heard already, this week I attended my very first Pitti Immagine event, Pitti Uomo 92. Pitti is one of the largest fashion events in Europe, bringing together brands and designers to showcase their work not only to buyers but also to the press. Not only was I there for my own personal blog, I was also writing a short piece for The Florentine magazine, which you can read here.

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence


locationLOCATION: Pitti Uomo 92
Fortezza da Basso, Florence, Italy 🇮🇹


Pitti Uomo is the menswear event under the Pitti name (uomo is ‘man’ in Italian) and this year, the theme for the events is ‘Boom Pitti Blooms, focusing on flowers with colour, patterns and textures, with the art direction by Sergio Colantuoni who says, “The theme is also a metaphor for our fairs, of what fertile ground they are for new and often unusual creative expressions.”

I didn’t know exactly what to expect from the event but as I soon realised, one of the major purposes of Pitti is for brands to reach out to new buyers and distributors, so it was interesting coming in from a blogger angle. Of course, on my blog, I focus mainly on womenswear and in particular, ethical and sustainable womenswear, so I planned to go in learning more about how ethics fit into menswear. As already mentioned, I was also there to write for The Florentine and you can read my 5 point sustainable round-up if that takes your fancy.

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence

It was hard to resist following the crowd and not taking some time to grab some street-style photos. It was 33°C on the day I attended, so I have to applaud the attendees dressed to the nines. In true fashionable style, I overheard one person say, “Even if I faint, it’s worth it.”.

If you’re in need of some sartorial style inspiration then Pitti Uomo is the place to be. It most definitely reinstated my love for tailoring and sleek suits. Those Pitti Peacocks are well dressed, albeit extremely hot and sticky.

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence


locationSAVE THE DUCK


I discovered Save The Duck a while before Pitti, knowing of their collaborations between Christopher Raeburn who is one of my favourite designers due to how he repurposes materials and is committed to that way of thinking across his whole brand. Actually talking to their team and understanding how they too, are extremely focused on being as sustainable as they can be, was rather inspiring.

Their latest collection for summer is their Recycled range, which is made of recycled materials from the lining to the zipper, and even uses recycled ‘Plumtech‘, which is their innovative material to replace feathers used in outerwear, making their brand vegan and sustainable. And although they manufacture their pieces in China, I was reassured that factories have to be certified in order to work with Save The Duck. Visiting their booth was most definitely my Pitti highlight, on par with meeting Christopher himself and attending their last collaborative presentation. I’ll be posting a piece dedicated to the collection, shortly.

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence


locationPRESIDENT’S


Although Pitti Uomo and the other Pitti fairs are open to worldwide exhibitors, of course being in Italy allowed for there to be plenty of brands Made In Italy. President’s use organic cotton in their shirts and tops and dye their leathers with vegetable tanning, so they’re on the right track.

Their brand, although sticking to traditional Tuscan craft, is modern and fresh and is a brand I will be keeping a close eye on whilst I travel the area. You can read more about President’s here.

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence

Sustainable Menswear at Pitti Uomo 92 in Florence


locationSTUTTERHEIM


And last, but most definitely not least, is Stutterheim, a Swedish raincoat brand who surprised me with their upfront honesty on where they stand on sustainability. John Laster, one of the directors of the company was very open when talking to me, sharing the fact that their materials are most certainly not of a sustainable nature with PVC coming from oil, of course. This doesn’t however, mean they’re entirely going down the wrong path. I and John both agreed that mindset can often be more important than fabrics…

“I think the biggest strain on the environment today is the buying and throwing away of things. It doesn’t matter if it’s made organic or not; use it five times and throw it away, use it for one season and it’s not sustainable.”


As I said, I will have another post up soon about the Christopher Raeburn presentation but for now, that is all from me at Pitti Uomo this season. You may just see me at the knitwear event, Pitti Filati, sometime soon…

What do you think of Italian menswear? Have you heard of any of these brands? Let me know in the comments!

Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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Pen to Paper Interview with… Ben Alun-Jones of UNMADE

By June 8, 2016 Pen to Paper

‘Pen to Paper’ is a new feature on TDP, which involves an informal handwritten form of interview between myself and creatives –  from fashion designers, photographers, journalists, artists and musicians, to people who generally inspire me from day-to-day. 


bio pic

Founded by Royal College of Art graduates Ben Alun-Jones, Hal Watts and Kirsty Emery, UNMADE collaborates with creatives across a range of disciplines to bring together the best of art, fashion and design, which you then define.
In just a few clicks disrupt your pattern, shift lines and clash colours to create a made-to-order piece of knitwear that’s uniquely you. They hold no stock and nothing is produced until you submit your order. You can find them in features including The New York Times, DAZED, BoF, The Guardian and more.

 WEBSITE // TWITTER // FACEBOOK // INSTAGRAM


Ben Alun-Jones UNMADE Interview


~ READ THE FULL TRANSCRIPT ~


When I discovered UNMADE through Susie Bubble’s blog (Style Bubble), I knew instantly that this was the kind of brand I’d like to know more about. Mixing technology with ethical and sustainable fashion is basically a dream for me and that’s exactly what they’re combining. I had the chance to send over some questions to Ben Alun-Jones who is one of their founders to ask some more about how their brand works and what they’re doing to make their mark in not only the sustainable area of fashion, but the industry as a whole.

The brand brings together innovative technology which lets consumers manipulate and change the designs of their knitwear to exactly how they want them, with the original designs coming straight from the minds of designers and artists including Christopher Raeburn, Malika Favre and Nicolas Sassoon. They have no stock which reduces waste and makes the whole experience even more unique.


We saw an industrial knitting machine for the first time. 💡 This was the lightbulb moment. We could make a unique garment from a digital file in a matter of a few hours. Now to make that dream a reality… (The software didn’t exist yet).

How and when did the concept for UNMADE come about?

Ben Alun-Jones UNMADE Interview

Ben Alun-Jones UNMADE Interview

Ben Alun-Jones UNMADE Interview


Simply put, no. Short term financial benefits trump longer term ethical and sustainable benefits. We’re trying to make a viable alternative to current industrial production (That happens to be more ethical and sustainable). We want people to choose it because its better, not because its more sustainable.

Do you think enough is being done to combat the issues around ethical and sustainable fashion?

What Ben said about making their brand a better alternative rather than a ‘more sustainable’ one was quite interesting to me. That’s the aim, isn’t it really? To be able to go to a brand with the knowledge that they’re focusing on ethical and sustainable issues, but actually shop from them because their designs and products are what draw you in.

Ben Alun-Jones UNMADE Interview


We are a completely different approach to working with brands, customers and manufacturing. We need the acceptance of all these people. (This is hard).

Technology is a big, if not the most important part of how UNMADE runs - what's the biggest challenge you face with weaving tech into fashion?

We’ve had to build all the tools to make unique production work on an industrial scale. Now we’re taking it to the wider industry to create a more creative, more sustainable and more responsive approach to the industrial production. Watch this space…

What's your next aim? What direction do you see the brand going in?

As an aspiring designer who wants to focus on sustainability as I grow and learn, UNMADE is a huge inspiration to me. The concept may be niche, but it’s not hard to imagine it growing even bigger and having a wider reach. I’m excited to see what’s coming next, especially when we’ve been left with a ‘Watch this space…


(IMAGES COURTESY OF UNMADE)


Lots of Love… Tolly Dolly Posh xx

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